November 2014 - RCF NuernbergRCF Nuernberg


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For time:

50 Row (calories)s

50 Push-ups

50 Air Squats

25 Burpees

40 Row (calories)s

40 Push-ups

40 Air Squats

20 Burpees

30 Row (calories)s

30 Push-ups

30 Air Squats

15 Burpees

20 Row (calories)s

20 Push-ups

20 Air Squats

10 Burpees

10 Row (calories)s

10 Push-ups

10 Air Squats

5 Burpees

For time:

50 Row (calories)s

50 Push-ups

50 Air Squats

25 Burpees

40 Row (calories)s

40 Push-ups

40 Air Squats

20 Burpees

30 Row (calories)s

30 Push-ups

30 Air Squats

15 Burpees

20 Row (calories)s

20 Push-ups

20 Air Squats

10 Burpees

10 Row (calories)s

10 Push-ups

10 Air Squats

5 Burpees

28 Nov 2014

Saskia

3 rounds for time of:
20 Double Unders
12 GHD Sit-ups
5 Cleans
Plank Hold, 2 mins

28 Nov 2014

Saskia

3 rounds for time of:
20 Double Unders
12 GHD Sit-ups
5 Cleans
Plank Hold, 2 mins

For time:
Row, 1000 m
Rest, 3 mins
Row, 750 m
Rest, 2:30
Row, 500 m
Rest, 2 mins
Row, 250 m

For time:
Row, 1000 m
Rest, 3 mins
Row, 750 m
Rest, 2:30
Row, 500 m
Rest, 2 mins
Row, 250 m

Complete as many rounds as possible in 12 mins of:

7 Dumbbell Thrusters, 45/30 lbs
7 Ball Slams
Row, 250 m

Complete as many rounds as possible in 12 mins of:

7 Dumbbell Thrusters, 45/30 lbs
7 Ball Slams
Row, 250 m

When it comes to injuries, there is one thing you should always do: seek medical advice. We are trainers, but not trained in recognizing how serious an injury is, whether it is minor or not. So, just as you go to experts when it comes to training, you should do so when it comes to injuries. If a physician is unable to tell you what went wrong and all he can say is that you shouldn’t exercise, you went to the wrong one.

That being said, there are couple of things you can expect from trainers and coaches, mainly in relation to injury prevention and rehabilitation. Before I go into that, let me introduce a couple of distinctions. Injuries are either a result of an accident or of simply overusing your body. (Of course, there are accidents, which happen due to overuse, but let’s not go there now.) You cannot really do anything to prevent accidents, in the sense that you cannot predict completely how and when they occur. Let’s say, you stand on the bus in a sloppy position, then it breaks suddenly and you fall and hurt your shoulders.

Injuries due to overuse are a different animal. One can distinguish between two types. One type occurs when you simply push hard and don’t allow your body to recover from previous workouts. Pain in the shoulders, knees, hips, or what you have is the result of performing basic movements. These should disappear once you introduce proper recovery methods such as rest days, good food, sufficient intake of Omega 3 to just name a few.

The other type of overuse occurs because one muscle group takes over some work from another group due to poor movement patterns and insufficient muscle recruitment. Not engaging the core properly when doing push ups/pull ups, presses is an example, how shoulder pain can surface. Tight hamstrings with zero gluteal activation, sets you up for lower back pain. Surprisingly, mostly the source of the problem is not where the pain actually surfaces or manifests itself.

In any case, if you ever wondered why we crawl/roll in seemingly weird positions during our warm up, there you have your answer. The aim is to activate the proper muscle groups and increase your mobility in the hips, ankles and shoulders, before we stress and tax them during our WODs or strength sessions. There is not one person who is not restricted in mobility in one or all of these areas. A warm up in the class can only play a minor role in setting you up for better and more efficient movement, so I encourage each of you to work on these areas on your own as well. RCFN coaches would be happy to assist you to get some additional fun stuff to improve your movement patterns.

As a starter, we will post some videos here from which you can select means to your own torture. Here is the first one for the shoulders. Super D is the guy with bands. Even Kelly Starrett went to learn from him some stuff. Enjoy!

Source: Reebok Crossfit Duna

When it comes to injuries, there is one thing you should always do: seek medical advice. We are trainers, but not trained in recognizing how serious an injury is, whether it is minor or not. So, just as you go to experts when it comes to training, you should do so when it comes to injuries. If a physician is unable to tell you what went wrong and all he can say is that you shouldn’t exercise, you went to the wrong one.

That being said, there are couple of things you can expect from trainers and coaches, mainly in relation to injury prevention and rehabilitation. Before I go into that, let me introduce a couple of distinctions. Injuries are either a result of an accident or of simply overusing your body. (Of course, there are accidents, which happen due to overuse, but let’s not go there now.) You cannot really do anything to prevent accidents, in the sense that you cannot predict completely how and when they occur. Let’s say, you stand on the bus in a sloppy position, then it breaks suddenly and you fall and hurt your shoulders.

Injuries due to overuse are a different animal. One can distinguish between two types. One type occurs when you simply push hard and don’t allow your body to recover from previous workouts. Pain in the shoulders, knees, hips, or what you have is the result of performing basic movements. These should disappear once you introduce proper recovery methods such as rest days, good food, sufficient intake of Omega 3 to just name a few.

The other type of overuse occurs because one muscle group takes over some work from another group due to poor movement patterns and insufficient muscle recruitment. Not engaging the core properly when doing push ups/pull ups, presses is an example, how shoulder pain can surface. Tight hamstrings with zero gluteal activation, sets you up for lower back pain. Surprisingly, mostly the source of the problem is not where the pain actually surfaces or manifests itself.

In any case, if you ever wondered why we crawl/roll in seemingly weird positions during our warm up, there you have your answer. The aim is to activate the proper muscle groups and increase your mobility in the hips, ankles and shoulders, before we stress and tax them during our WODs or strength sessions. There is not one person who is not restricted in mobility in one or all of these areas. A warm up in the class can only play a minor role in setting you up for better and more efficient movement, so I encourage each of you to work on these areas on your own as well. RCFN coaches would be happy to assist you to get some additional fun stuff to improve your movement patterns.

As a starter, we will post some videos here from which you can select means to your own torture. Here is the first one for the shoulders. Super D is the guy with bands. Even Kelly Starrett went to learn from him some stuff. Enjoy!

Source: Reebok Crossfit Duna


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